Did you Know: #Magnesium & #VitaminD

Magnesium Boosts Vitamin D

Do you believe you are getting enough vitamin D in your daily nutrition? Did you know if your diet lacks magnesium, you won’t get the full benefit of vitamin D?

Before you start buying supplements, see a physician and ask for a vitamin panel, blood work report. I have had many fitness clients over the years that suffered unusual symptoms during regular exercise. Most symptoms were directly contributed to the lack of certain vitamins and minerals. Always get the facts before self medicating to avoid toxic overloads which can result in other health concerns.

According to Webmd.com

If you shun the sun, suffer from milk allergies, or adhere to a strict vegan diet, you may be at risk for vitamin D deficiency. Known as the sunshine vitamin, vitamin D is produced by the body in response to skin being exposed to sunlight. It also occurs naturally in a few foods–including some fish, fish liver oils, and egg yolks–and in fortified dairy and grain products

Webmd
for full article click here.

Study Published in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association

The study found that vitamin D is not properly metabolized when magnesium levels are low.

Abstract

Nutrients usually act in a coordinated manner in the body. Intestinal absorption and subsequent metabolism of a particular nutrient, to a certain extent, is dependent on the availability of other nutrients. Magnesium and vitamin D are 2 essential nutrients that are necessary for the physiologic functions of various organs. Magnesium assists in the activation of vitamin D, which helps regulate calcium and phosphate homeostasis to influence the growth and maintenance of bones. All of the enzymes that metabolize vitamin D seem to require magnesium, which acts as a cofactor in the enzymatic reactions in the liver and kidneys. Deficiency in either of these nutrients is reported to be associated with various disorders, such as skeletal deformities, cardiovascular diseases, and metabolic syndrome. …

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association
for full study and report, click here.

Again, please have proper blood work performed and evaluated before starting any supplement program. If you have high potassium concerns, taking magnesium can result in elevated potassium levels.

Foods high in magnesium

  • legumes
  • whole grains
  • nuts
  • seeds
  • leafy greens
  • dark chocolate

Catherine Bares


 

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Ways to Avoid Overeating and Drinking during the Christmas and New Year Seasons

With Christmas and New Years upon us, I wanted to give you some ideas to outsmart overeating and over drinking.  Let’s face it, we snack, we eat dinners, we drink cocktails, and before you know it, you are suffering with a stuffed belly and a headache from too much alcohol.  There is always an assortment of food and desserts that we have to try.  Don’t get caught up in the moments and suffer for it later.  

Things you can do to outsmart overeating:

  • Never show up to a party hungry.  Do not “skip” a meal to “leave room”.  This is self sabotage! Always eat a hearty, healthy meal before attending any get together.  Chances are you won’t be eating very healthy the rest of the day, so start off strong. 
  • Don’t use large plates or bowls.   Make mindful decisions to serve small portions of everything you want to try.  We usually eat many different dishes, so smaller, bite sized portions are the best way to go.  You can always go back for more later.
  • Slow Down!!!!!  When you eat fast, your “fullness” doesn’t show up until after you have eaten too much.  Eat slower, hold discussions while eating, and be mindful about it.  Put your fork down between bites.  Check out this previous blog on snacking tricks.
  • Eat soup and/or salad before eating main meal.
  • Be polite to “food pushers”.   Tell them you will have more later when your fullness declines.  Don’t fall for peer pressure when it comes to food.  Recognize it for what it is, and find a way out of the situation.
  • Stay hydrated; It helps the “full” feeling kick in. Check out this previous blog on how being thirsty causes us to overeat. 

Things you can do to outsmart over drinking:

  • Stay hydrated.  I like to drink a glass of water with every beer I drink.  If I am drinking heavier alcohol, I like to drink 2 glasses of water for every drink.
  • When drinking wine, Sip slowly, enjoy the taste, let it linger on the tongue and put the glass down between sips.  If we hold our drink, we tend to sip more and finish the drink faster. 

Activities to keep from overeating and over drinking:

  • Move away from the food area
  • Get out in the yard with the kids; toss a football around
  • Take a group walk after eating
  • Dance
  • Have fun!

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!

Catherine Bares

*I am not a nutritionist. You should consult physicians when feeling ill after a day of too much indulging.  These are tips that I like to incorporate in my holiday gatherings but may not be a good fit for everyone.  The water to alcohol ratio works for me with light drinking.  Don’t overdo it.   


 

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Use Food instead of Energy Drinks

I am not a nutritionist; you should always discuss your eating habits with a doctor or nutritionist before making changes to your day to day eating habits.  The information provided below was found on line.  Please click the link to the article to see the story in its entirety along with reference notes.

I have read some stories how people are being hospitalized from overdoing energy drinks. We should do some research on how to properly fuel up to increase energy rather than take the easy, convenient road to energy.  Lets look at the foods that can give you an energy boost.  I came across a Newsletter on line:  “27 Foods that can give you more energy.” (click the link to read the article in its entirety.)

  1. Bananas

According to the article, “Bananas may be the best foods for energy. They are an excellent source of carbohydrates, potassium and vitamin B6, all of which can help boost energy levels in your body.”

2. Fatty Fish

“Fatty fish like salmon and tuna are good sources of protein, fatty acids and B vitamins, making them great foods to include in your diet.”

3. Brown Rice

“Brown rice is a very nutritious food. Unlike white rice, it is less processed and retains more nutritional value in the form of fiber, vitamins and minerals.”

4. Sweet Potatoes

“…sweet potatoes are a nutritious source of energy for those looking for an extra boost.”  I like to eat  my sweet potato with cinnamon and cayenne pepper.  Yummy!

5. Coffee

“Coffee might be the first food you’d think to consume when you’re looking for a boost of energy.”

6. Eggs

“Packed in protein..”

7. Apples

“Due to their rich content of natural sugars and fiber, apples can provide a slow and sustained energy release.”

8. Water

“Water is essential for life.  ……and is involved in many cellular functions, including energy production.”

9. Dark Chocolate

“The antioxidants in cocoa have been shown to have many health benefits, such as increasing blood flow throughout the body.”

10. Yerba Mate’

“Yerba Mate’ contains antioxidants and caffeine. ….”

11. Goji Berries

“Besides being packed with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, this fruit is known to be a good source of fiber.”

12.  Quinoa

“Quinoa is a seed popular for its high protein content.”

13. Oatmeal

“Oatmeal is a whole-grain cereal that could provide you with long-lasting energy.”

14. Yogurt

“Yogurt is an excellent snack to fuel up your day.”

15.  Hummus

“Chickpeas in hummus are a good source of complex carbs and fiber that the body uses for steady energy.”

16. Edamame

“Edamame can be an easy satisfying pick-me-up snack.”  I am not trying to get into a technical debate on Soy products; it made the list so I kept it in the blog.  Be responsible and research the pros and cons on ingesting soy products and how that affects the human body.

17.  Lentils

“…..Lentils are a good source of nutrients and help boost energy levels.”

18. Avocados

“…they’re rich in healthy fats and fiber.”

19. Oranges

“Oranges are famous for their high vitamin C content.  One orange can provide as much as 106% of the RDI for Vitamin C.” “Additionally, oranges contain antioxidant compounds that can provide protection from oxidative stress.”

20. Strawberries

“Strawberries are another good energy-boosting fruit.” “….Besides helping fight inflammation in the body, the antioxidants in strawberries may help fight fatigue and give you energy.”

21. Seeds

“Seeds, such as chia, flax seeds and pumpkin seeds, could also increase your energy levels.” “These seeds are generally high in plant-based omega-3 fatty acids.  Low levels of Omega-3 fatty acids have been linked to increased inflammation and fatigue.”

22.  Beans

“….Beans are digested slowly, which helps maintain stable blood sugar levels and gives you steady energy.  Additionally, beans contain antioxidants that can help fight inflammation and promote energy.”

23. Green Tea

“…It has a high concentration of powerful antioxidants that can help prevent oxidative stress and inflammation.”

24. Nuts

“…Most nuts like almonds, walnuts and cashews are known for their high calories and abundance of proteins, carbs and healthy fats.  These nutrients can provide you with a slower release of energy during the day.”

25. Popcorn

“..It’s high in carbs and fiber, which can make it very satisfying and a good option for an energy-boosting snack.”  I like to make popcorn the old fashioned way, so I can control what goes in it.

26. Leafy Green Vegetables

“Leafy green vegetables, such as spinach and kale, are excellent sources of nutrients that promote energy.  They are high in iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium and vitamins A, C, E and K.  Additionally they are packed with folic acid, fiber and antioxidants that provide health benefits.”  Be mindful how Vitamin K, magnesium and potassium affect certain health conditions.

27. Beets

“…Studies have shown that beetroot may be able to improve blood flow due to its antioxidant content and naturally occurring nitrates.”

I will make an effort this week to steer away from processed foods and eat more whole, natural foods.  I always feel better when I follow natural food, eating habits.  Hope you enjoyed the information and again, always do the research and ask for medical advice if you have certain conditions that will be irritated by foods.Facebooklinkedinyoutubeinstagramby feather
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#Sugar Shocker-How much sugar is in that?

My son came over the other day with one of his favorite soft drinks.  (Jolly Rancher soda)  I was curious so, I picked up the bottle to review the sugar content.

  • 25g sugar-per serving
  • 2.5 servings
  • 62.5g sugar-total intake

My reaction:  Oh My Goooooodness! Are you kidding me?

How does 62.5 grams of sugar equate into teaspoons?  I did some research online and found this equation:

  • One teaspoon of granulated sugar equals 4 grams of sugar.
  • 62.5 grams of sugar = 15.62 teaspoons of sugar.  Wow! in one bottle of soda
  • Sugar Shockers click here to read “Sugar Shockers: Foods surprisingly high in sugar” from WebMD archive.

Names for added sugars on labels include:

  • Brown sugar
  • Corn sweetener
  • Corn syrup
  • Fruit juice concentrates
  • High-fructose corn syrup
  • Honey
  • Invert sugar
  • Malt sugar
  • Molasses
  • Raw sugar
  • Sugar
  • Sugar molecules ending in “ose” (dextrose, fructose, glucose, lactose, maltose, sucrose)
  • Syrup

Pay attention to sugar content.  Do some research, look at the rapidly increasing diabetes statistics and how it is affecting the youth and their health.  Don’t just assume that it is okay to consume because the packaging contains misleading information.

Catherine Bares

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#Protein-How much do you need?

According to a contributor for the American Council on Exercise (ACE) “The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for daily protein intake is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight (or multiply your weight in pounds by 0.36). This modest amount is the minimum a person needs to meet the basic nutritional requirements to prevent deficiency. Using this calculation, a 140-pound woman would need 50.9 grams of protein per day. However, there is ample evidence that this recommended level is too low and that protein needs are actually much higher. Research suggests that most people need 1.0 to 2.2 grams per kilogram of body weight, depending on their health goals. For weight loss, a diet that is 30% protein helps with satiety and decreased caloric intake. For muscle growth, 1.5 to 2.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight is recommended.”

To read the article in it’s entirety including other needs for protein consumption, click on the blue underlined section above and it will take you to the webpage that also includes delicious, high protein recipes.

Catherine Bares

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#Foodborne Pathogens

Click to review eatright.org’s write up about the most common foodborne pathogens.

Suffering with a little stomach bug this week I find myself asking what did I eat that could have possibly caused it?  Although I have not come across the answer, I did find this article helpful in prevention for the most common foodborne pathogens illness.

Catherine Bares

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#Everyone is Talking about Detox Diets

“9 Ways to Support Your Body’s Natural Detox”

According to an article I found: “Detoxification support doesn’t need to consist of a rigorous plan; doing some or all of the following can support detoxification:”

  • Maintain adequate hydration with clean water.
  • Eat five to nine servings of fruit and vegetables per day.
  • Consume enough fiber each day from vegetables, nuts, seeds and whole grains.
  • Eat cruciferous vegetables, berries, artichokes, garlic, onions, leeks, turmeric and milk thistle, and drink green tea. These foods support detoxification pathways.
  • Consume adequate protein, which is critical to maintaining optimum levels of glutathione, the body’s master detoxification enzyme.
  • Consider taking a multivitamin/multimineral to fill any gaps in a healthy diet, since certain vitamins and minerals enable the body’s detoxification processes to function.
  • Eat naturally fermented foods such as kefir, yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut — or take a high-quality probiotic — to help the body manage toxins from microbes that live in the gut.
  • N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor to glutathione (the body’s master detoxification enzyme), is often recommended to support the body’s natural detoxification activity.
  • Maintain bowel regularity.

To read the entire article click on the title line at the top.

Catherine Bares

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#Another food tip-Tomatoes

Here’s another tip from Tim Skwiat, Head Nutrition Coach, BioTrust Nutrition:

“You may have heard that most fruits and veggies are better consumed raw instead of cooked, as cooking can reduce their vitamin and mineral content.  While this is true in many cases, it’s the exact opposite with tomatoes.  You see, tomatoes are rich in lycopene, a phytonutrient with many positive health benefits.  Unlike other veggies, cooking actually increases concentrations of lycopene in tomatoes, so enjoy tomato sauce, roasted tomatoes, and other cooked dishes with tomatoes more often!”

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#Did you Know? Greek Yogurt

Did you know the “water” you see settled on the top of the Greek Yogurt when you peel back the lid is actually whey that is packed with protein, vitamins, and calcium.  Don’t dump it!  Mix the watery whey back into the yogurt to avoid missing out on Greek yogurt’s fat-burning punch!

I sprinkle a little, plain cinnamon (no sugar added) and stir in with the whey.  It is scientifically proven that cinnamon:

  • helps control blood sugar levels
  • helps maintain insulin sensitivity
  • a VERY powerful antioxidant
  • may have antibacterial and antifungal properties

Top with Ezekiel, whole sprouted grain cereal for a little crunch. 🙂

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